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Last month, organizations around the world working in WASH and women’s and girls’ rights joined forces to celebrate the first ever Menstrual Hygiene Day. Created to bring attention to the challenges that many women and girls face during menstruation and to elevate innovative solutions, the event also hopes to help break the taboo surrounding a biological process that half the world experiences.

This infographic illustrates the ways in which menstrual hygiene is linked to education, the economy, and health, and highlights the misinformation and lack of facilities and hygienic materials that hamper good menstrual hygiene for many of the world’s women and girls. It originally appeared here.

Let's Start the Conversation About Menstruation
Are you a WASHfunders Power User?

Have you searched our map to orient yourself to the WASH funding landscape? Do you regularly read this blog? Are you familiar with our featured case studies or funder profiles? If you’ve visited WASHfunders, we’d love your feedback as part of our evaluation of the site.

Launched more than 2 ½ years ago, WASHfunders has been an experiment for our team at the Foundation Center. We hoped WASHfunders would facilitate knowledge-sharing, foster collaboration, and promote transparency related to foundation funding. But the truth is, we know relatively little about how our audience is using the site. Now is an opportune time for us to step back and take stock -- to understand where we can improve and how the site can be a better resource for the sector.

We’re currently working with an independent evaluation team to assess the impact and effectiveness of WASHfunders and want to hear your thoughts on the site.

If you’re interested in participating, the evaluation team will contact you to conduct a short one-time phone interview. If you would like to contribute to this effort, please contact Seema Shah at sms@foundationcenter.org. Thank you for your help! 

Allison Tummon Kamphuis, program leader for the Children's Safe Drinking Water Program at P&G

Editor’s Note: This guest blog post was authored by Allison Tummon Kamphuis, program leader for the Children’s Safe Drinking Water Program at P&G. In the post, Allison provides an overview of the company’s extensive engagement in the water sector and reveals how P&G’s approach to corporate philanthropy for WASH has responded to context and evolved in the decade since the initiative began.

More than 1,600 children still die every day from diseases caused by drinking unsafe water. At P&G, we believe we can help make a difference in the global water crisis. P&G is committed to the long-term, not-for-profit provision of clean water in the developing world and is engaged in the global drinking water crisis in four principle ways: as a technology supplier, water advocate, grant-maker, and program implementer.

The Children’s Safe Drinking Water Program (CSDW) is P&G’s signature philanthropic effort to bring clean water to children and families throughout the developing world. Established in 2004, the CSDW Program has grown over nearly a decade into an initiative that has provided clean water in
more than 75 countries and is now supplying 1.3 billion liters annually to global emergency relief and development organizations. In April 2014, P&G announced that the CSDW Program had reached the seven billion liter milestone -- essentially the equivalent of a liter of clean water for every person on the planet.

Children's Safe Drinking Water Program (CSDW)

The cornerstone of our non-profit initiative is the P&G water purification packet (formerly known as PUR Purifier of Water) that was invented by P&G scientists in the UK in collaboration with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The powdered mixture in each small four gram sachet is like a mini-water treatment plant for 10 liters of water. With simple household implements -- a bucket, a stick, and a cloth -- each packet removes dirt, arsenic, and parasites and kills bacteria and viruses, making previously contaminated water clean and potable in only 30 minutes.    

P&G water purification packet

Originally launched by P&G as a commercial product for consumers in developing countries, the product proved challenging to market with sufficient return on investment given the need for interpersonal education and health related behavior change among consumers who regularly consumed contaminated water. Instead of abandoning the innovative technology, P&G started a philanthropic effort around the packets and built strong partnerships with many leading non-profit organizations who became the lead distributors and educators of users of the P&G packets. The lesson: be flexible with the plan and change according to the needs of the local market.    

These early challenges and lessons learned in the commercial market highlight the critical importance of partnerships. The rapid growth of the program to a cumulative total of more than 700 million water purification packets distributed has been achieved through a multi-focused strategy that includes: emergency response to major disasters; rural community, clinic, and school WASH educational programs; and integration with global health initiatives for the most vulnerable, including people living with HIV/AIDS and malnourished children. The lesson: identify where you or your technology is likely to have the most impact and build partnerships with experts in those implementation areas.

As a WASH funder and grantmaker, P&G has invested more than $50 million towards providing clean drinking water, including investments in additional plant capacity to provide more P&G packets as the program has expanded. Each year P&G grants also support community WASH education and capacity building projects, as well as emergency relief pre-positioning and training around the world. The CSDW Program continues to explore targeted grant programs for vulnerable groups and expand public-private partnerships with global donors who have the same objectives. While P&G’s grants are smaller than those of major international bilateral donors, they are intended to support the integration of clean drinking water, along with hygiene and sanitation education, into existing programs to make them more clinically and cost effective. Lesson learned: leveraging existing infrastructure to integrate health interventions can make already successful programs even more effective.

For the past decade, P&G has also worked with advocacy partners to raise awareness of the global water crisis while promoting a variety of solutions to help address the lack of safe drinking water. P&G was a founding member of the UNICEF/WHO Network for Household Water Treatment and Safe Storage and through the network has helped to establish household water treatment as a viable and practical means of improving access to clean drinking water in areas of the world where safe water infrastructure does not exist. P&G has also participated in the Global Water Challenge, the US Water Partnership, and has been a long-standing member of the Clinton Global InitiativeLesson learned: building awareness is a continuous effort and advocacy efforts are critical for local and international recognition and advancing the cause.

As the CSDW Program looks to its next decade, P&G continues to build on the lessons learned in the first 10 years of the initiative. The company is forging new partnerships with humanitarian organizations throughout the world and extending CSDW operations into more countries. The success of reaching the company’s 2020 goal is dependent on collaboration with governing entities and many public/private partners, complementary work with other technology solutions, and engagement with the P&G family of brands and employees.

As the target year for the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) approaches, Global Water Challenge invites you to the webinar, Elevating the Post-2015 Water Goal. The event will share perspectives from a diversity of stakeholders in the water sector on the process of establishing a meaningful goal around water as part of this next phase.

Tuesday, May 13 (11AM - 12:30PM EST)

Monica Ellis, CEO of Global Water Challenge, will moderate the discussion among the following panelists:

  • Cecilia Scharp, Senior Advisor, UNICEF
  • Francesca Bernardini, Senior Advisor, Permanent Mission of Switzerland to the UN
  • Krishanti Vignarajah, Senior Advisor, U.S. Department of State
  • Marco Daniel, Coordinator, Swiss Water Partnership

To register for the webinar, click here. And to learn more about country progress on MDGs and other national-level indicators on water and sanitation recorded in the 2012 GLAAS report, visit our funding map.

Webinar: Elevating the Post-2015 Water Goal
WASH Grantmakers Network at the 2014 WASH Sustainability Forum

This year’s 5th annual WASH Sustainability Forum will take place from June 30 to July 1 at the RAI in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. While previous WASH Sustainability Forums focused on concepts underpinning sustainability, this year’s Forum is oriented around the application of sustainability principles to WASH projects.

WASH Grantmakers Network

To introduce this theme, the WASH Grantmakers Network (WGN), together with Xylem Watermark, will host an orientation dinner in advance of the Forum, on June 29th.  The dinner will provide guests with an overview of the Forum and offer tips on making the most of your attendance.

WGN is coordinated by WASH Advocates and is an affinity group for philanthropic organizations focused on WASH issues. To RSVP for this free dinner, contact Ben Mann at bmann@WASHadvocates.org or +1-202-293-4002. Registration for the Forum is also available online here.

Sue Dorsey, chief financial officer at Water For People

Editor’s Note: This post was authored by Sue Dorsey, chief financial officer at Water For People. In the post, Sue identifies several issues with current funding mechanisms in the social sector and proposes solutions that will support rather than hamper organizations in building resilience and realizing bold visions. The post originally appeared on Water For People’s blog.

In a sea of social entrepreneurs, I am a rather unique voice. As the CFO of Water For People, I am part of a team that makes our vision of ensuring Everyone around the world has access to safe water and sanitation, Forever, a reality. Our Everyone, Forever initiative spans 30 districts across four continents reaching more than four million people, and we are proving that ending water and sanitation poverty is possible in our lifetime. Behind every bold vision is a “reality team” working to bring it to life. Being a member of that team is a huge responsibility and incredibly inspiring.

I believe that a critical component to making a world free of social, cultural, political, and economic barriers a reality is building strong nonprofit organizations, businesses, and government institutions. Our vision is the spark, and resilient organizations with appropriate funding mechanisms and a regulated environment is the engine that will get us there. But as it stands, current practices in the nonprofit sector won’t get us there. Here’s why, and what needs to change:

1. Funders offer small short-term commitments forcing organizations to create short-term solutions for long-term challenges.

#ChangeThat: Funding streams need to adjust their timelines to fit long-term solutions and outcomes.

2. Nonprofits struggle with success indicators, putting too much focus on overhead ratios that are easy to calculate but also easy to manipulate, leading to misdirected philanthropic investments.

#ChangeThat: Making outcome-based grants requires nonprofits to focus on long-term sustainable outcomes.

3. Funders generally resist financing capacity-building, and only focus on tangible projects. 

#ChangeThat: Financing monitoring and evaluation, talent acquisition and IT investments would actually increase efficiencies and reduce overhead.

4. Out of control donor restrictions lead to soaring overhead costs and trumps appropriate and necessary programmatic changes.

#ChangeThat: What if funding under $1M or less than five years could not legally be restricted under FASB rules?

5. Lack of public transparency for the true costs to run a nonprofit organization. 

#ChangeThat: What if we got rid of the functional allocation and asked NPOs to report on a full cost recovery basis on their 990, educating and sensitizing the public on the real costs to change the world?

6. Limited to no communication between donors and NPOs about organizational pain points.

#ChangeThat: Donors should ask and nonprofits should offer insight into what they need to succeed from a programmatic and operational standpoint.

There is an exciting opportunity to bring the reality teams from behind the curtain to be a voice for change in the nonprofit sector, by educating donors and effecting change in organizations. We have seen examples of this - InsideNGO has created a community of international development organizations to advocate for effective funding from USAID and other institutional funders. They are currently working on a database of information around the true costs of running an effective organization. And Dan Pallotta has been a strong voice on this issue for years. His TedTalk about the way we think about and execute charity has over three million views and growing, which shows there is an appetite to reinvent the nonprofit sector so we can actually change the world.

If you peek behind the curtain, you will find “reality teams” around the world poised to lead this change.

I see a nonprofit sector stepping up and making investments in data collection and analysis to allow for more data-driven decision-making. I see nonprofits sharing indicators and data across sectors to align us around a common set of benchmarks, providing a clearer picture of what success looks like and progress made towards that success. Greater transparency and accountability will build trust and collaboration with the funding community, and this will lead donors to reduce burdensome and unnecessary restrictions that only serve to increase overhead and reduce programmatic outcomes. I see government regulation pulling back from functional allocation to ensure nonprofits show the public a true picture of what it costs to run an effective, sustainable philanthropic organization.

Reaching our vision where Everyone has access to safe water and sanitation Forever is something we take very seriously. Anything less would just not be good enough.

Earlier this month, the Sanitation and Water for All (SWA) High Level Meeting (HLM) was hosted by the World Bank in Washington, D.C. The partnership’s third convening -- watched closely by those involved in the WASH sector -- brought together ministers of finance, health, and WASH from developing countries, as well as donors and other development partners to discuss specific commitments to achieve universal access to clean water and adequate sanitation.

An important outcome of the HLM was the endorsement of 265 new commitments addressing a range of issues in WASH -- from increasing the availability and efficiency of financial resources, to improving access to services and strengthening the institutions responsible for the delivery of water and sanitation.

In a short video report posted to SWA’s website, Barbara Frost, Chief Executive of  WaterAid, discusses her impressions of the meeting and lauds the group’s open dialogue about sector-wide challenges -- such as addressing donor fragmentation and balancing the involvement of the private sector with the human right to water.

webcast from the 2014 meeting has also been made available on the World Bank’s website.

Editor’s Note: This guest post was authored by Libby Plumb, Senior Communications Advisor for WaterAid America, who has recently returned from visiting WaterAid’s water, sanitation and hygiene programs in the slums of Kampala, Uganda. 

Rehema and her daughter Mariam carrying water home from the spring in Rubaga, Kampala. Credit: WaterAid / Libby Plumb

Rehema and her daughter Mariam carrying water home from the spring in Rubaga, Kampala. Credit: WaterAid / Libby Plumb

Mariam is the only child of 22-year-old single mom Rehema. On the way to and from the local spring, near the Rubaga slum in Uganda’s capital city, Kampala, she toddles behind her mother. It’s a journey they make four times a day to bring home enough water for drinking, cooking and washing.

Even little Mariam carries a jerry can of water: while Mom struggles under the weight of two 22 pound (10-liter) yellow jerry cans, Mariam follows behind carrying a bright red 11 pound (five-liter) jerry can – quite a feat for such a young child.

Rehema knows the quality of the spring water is questionable and could be risky for her daughter’s health. Kampala’s poorly constructed pit latrines and a high water table are a lethal combination as feces can easily contaminate the water supply. It’s not just water quality that is an issue. Accessibility is also a major challenge. With hundreds of people relying on the spring for water, crowds build up, with long waits common in the morning and evening when the heat of the sun is not so fierce. 

Rehema commented: “It’s very difficult to collect water from there. At 8 or 9 p.m. it is so crowded that it can take more than 30 minutes.”

Tensions often flare at the spring. Alongside women and children collecting water for their own domestic use are water vendors, usually men, who come to the spring to fill four or more jerry cans with water that they attach to bicycles and take to customers who pay for delivery service. Women and children are often pushed out of the way by vendors forcing their way to the front of the line. 

The need for safe, affordable, accessible water services in Rubaga is clear, but there are challenges inherent in extending piped water services into low-income neighborhoods. 

In other areas of the city where the National Water and Sewerage Company (NWSC) has granted water connections, it is common for landlords to sell water to their tenants for four to eight times the official rate. Poor families who are unable to afford the inflated rate continue to use polluted springs, even where there’s a tap right next to their home. 

Farahilh Masane collecting water from a prepaid meter in Kawempe, Kampala. Credit: WaterAid / Libby Plumb

Farahilh Masane collecting water from a prepaid meter in Kawempe, Kampala. Credit: WaterAid / Libby Plumb

A pilot program of pre-paid water meters being rolled out by NWSC and donors aims to tackle this problem. The meters are operated by an electronic key, known as a token, that is pre-loaded with credit. Anyone, landlord or tenant, can buy a key and refill it with credit. As water is dispensed, the meter deducts credit from the token at the official rate.  In this way, consumers deal directly with NWSC and there is no scope for middlemen to inflate the price. Consumers benefit from safe, affordable water, while NWSC benefits from knowing that by paying upfront, consumers are unable to default on payment of water bills. 

The system is not perfect. Vandalism has been known to damage meters, causing them to malfunction. Another concern is whether all tenants, particularly newcomers to the area, are in the know about how to buy and use tokens. But it’s a system that shows promise and offers hope to areas like Rubaga that are still unserved with water. 

Farahilh Masane is a resident of the Kawempe Division, where prepaid meters have been installed by Water and Sanitation for the Urban Poor (WSUP), with support and funding from the Coca-Cola Africa Foundation and WaterAid. She told us: “I walk across the road to the prepaid meter because it is cheaper there: 100 Shillings [4 US cents] for four jerry cans. There is a private tap right here but it is too expensive for me: 200 Shillings [8 US cents] per jerry can. Before the meter was installed I collected water from a spring, but so many people near it have pit latrines, the water was contaminated.”

Back in Rubaga, Rehema is hopeful that she will be able to benefit from piped water soon too. “It would change my life to have clean water and live in a better environment.” 

USAID Releases Field Guide for Water and Development Strategy

Last week, USAID released Water and Development Strategy: Implementation Field Guide. The document serves as a reference tool to help USAID Operating Units understand and apply the agency’s 2013-2018 Water and Development Strategy.

Design and implementation of the strategy is guided by a results-oriented approach, using a set of standard indicators on water, sanitation, hygiene, and agriculture. The Field Guide lifts up the following key points about USAID’s strategic approach:

  • Geographic focus areas for WASH for health programming are determined by country needs and vulnerability; opportunity and potential; and strategic considerations. Priority countries for water for agriculture are those identified by the U.S. Government's Feed the Future initiative.
  • Monitoring and evaluation should be applied as mutually reinforcing, but distinct, tools. It is also recommended that Operating Units develop and implement a learning plan around the program cycle.
  • To achieve the greatest sustainable impact on health, WASH programming should aim for a balance of: access to hardware, behavior changes, and enabling policies and institutions.
  • The principal legislative driver of USAID WASH funding is the Water for the Poor Act. Global Climate Change Initiative, Biodiversity, and other water- and food-related discretionary programs are also funding sources that can be leveraged.

By sharing the document publicly, USAID aims to ensure coordination of their efforts with the wider water sector. The Field Guide will be updated periodically. What do you think of the Guide? Feel free to share your reactions in the comments.

Winners of 'Reinvent the Toilet Challenge: India' Announced

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and India's Biotechnology Industry Research Assistance Council have announced the winners of the Reinvent the Toilet Challenge: India.

Six organizations were awarded grants totaling $2 million to develop innovative "next-generation toilets" that can deliver safe, affordable, and sustainable sanitation solutions in India. A collaboration between the Gates Foundation, BIRAC, and the Indian Ministry of Science and Technology, the competition is funded by investments of $1 million each from the Gates Foundation and the ministry's Department of Biotechnology.

Announced at the "Reinvent the Toilet Fair: India" in New Delhi, the grant recipients are Eram Scientific Solutions, which, in partnership with the University of South Florida, will field test a solar-powered modular electronic toilet that is integrated with a mixed-waste processing unit; the Amrita School of Biotechnology, which will test the use of viral agents to kill pathogens and odor-producing bacteria in fecal waste; Pradin Technologies, which will test the viability of using ultrasound to reduce water use in toilets; the Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, which, in partnership with Fresh Rooms Life Sciences, will develop a single-household container that uses human feces to incubate black soldier fly larvae, which can be processed into marketable products; the Institute of Chemical Technology, which will evaluate the concept of using fine sand-like material and an air blower to create a water-free toilet interface free of odor and flies; and BITS Pilani K.K. Birla Goa Campus, which, in partnership with Ghent University and Sustainable Biosolutions, will design a septic tank that uses electrochemistry to reduce organic pollutants and improve the quality of discharged effluent.

"Effective and comprehensive sanitation seems an impossible dream for India," said BIRAC chair K. Vijay Raghavan. "Yet today we see a congruence of new and applicable science and technology, its affordability, and sustainable implementation. This congruence is a great opportunity, which we cannot afford to let slip. By implementing effective solutions in each kind of social context, big problems can be dealt with in small units and be catalysts for scaling up."

The Gates Foundation also announced a partnership with South Africa's Department of Science and Technology to field test technologies developed as part of the global Reinvent the Toilet Challenge. The foundation and DST will invest $1 million and approximately $2.76 million (30 million rand), respectively, in the effort.

"By applying creative thinking and new approaches to sanitation challenges, we can improve people's lives. And we have no doubt that these new partnerships with India and South Africa will help us achieve this," said Brian Arbogast, director of the Water, Sanitation & Hygiene team at the Gates Foundation. "We believe that with governmental leadership, new business models, and innovation, we can dramatically increase the progress made in tackling this global sanitation crisis."

"Indian Researchers Selected to Develop Next Generation Toilets." Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Press Release 03/22/2014.

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